Acupuncture and Sleep

.

Towards a Better Night Sleep

Many people will experience some sleep issues at some point. Sometimes our daily life is more stressful and we feel more agitated at bedtime. While at other times, insomnia surprises us for no apparent reason. If these sleep disruptions happen too often and we can no longer find the necessary rest, the night can even become a source of anxiety.

I regularly see people struggling with sleep disorders in the clinic, whether it is for difficulty falling asleep, interrupted sleep, early awakening, or hypersomnia. Every week, I see how acupuncture can be of significant help to people looking to regain a restful sleep.

In this article, I’ll share with you the perspective of traditional oriental medicine on sleep disorders, along with some additional tips to help you sleep better.

The Yin and Yang of Sleeping

Acupuncture has been used for millennia to rebalance the « Yin » and « Yang » state of the body. Let’s take a closer look at this fundamental concept of traditional oriental medicine, in order to draw a parallel with our current representation of human physiology, and the balance of the autonomic nervous system.

The body naturally seeks to maintain its vital systems in a healthy balance. Biologists call this state homeostasis. In sleep disorders, the autonomic nervous system is usually out of balance, and the body does not go into rest mode. Recent studies show that acupuncture promotes sleep 1,2,3, by modulating the autonomic nervous system, allowing the body to restore its natural balance, its homeostasis 4.

Traditional Chinese medicine describes the different states of the body in another language, but there are many parallels with physiology. The « Yin » state of the body is similar to the state induced by the portion of the nervous system, which signals our organs and vital functions to enter a state of relaxation, a mode favorable to rest, to digestion, and regeneration of the body (this is the parasympathetic branch of the nervous system). The « Yang » state is similar to the state induced by the portion of the nervous system which signals our body to enter alert mode, following stress for example (this is the sympathetic branch of the system. nervous). This state is related to awakening 4.

Thus, in people struggling with sleep disorders, I work in the clinic to restore the balance between their « Yin » and « Yang » state. A biologist could say, in other words, that acupuncture will modulate their nervous system, in order to promote a return to homeostasis!

Life style habits that favor sleep

It has also been shown that adopting certain habits can promote a deeper, restful sleep. Here are a few tips.

Consolidating your circadian rhythm

Photo by Bas Masseus

The circadian rhythm is an internal biological rhythm lasting approximately 24 hours. A desynchronization between internal sleep-wake rhythms and the light-darkness cycle can cause a person to experience insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, or both.

Adopting habits that strengthen the circadian rhythm promotes sleep. Among other things, synchronizing our exposure to light and darkness, according to the time of day will help us sleep better 6,7. This can be done by exposing yourself to sunlight or other light sources during the day, and diming the lights in the evening. It is important to reduce your exposure to screens in the evening, as they emit light that mimics the effect of the sun on the body, and stimulates wakefulness. If you can’t reduce your screen time in the evening, consider installing a blue light filter on your devices.

Also, try to maintain a stable waking and sleeping schedule throughout the week. Large variations in the time of getting up and going to bed can contribute to sleep disturbances in some people. Maintaining regular eating hours also has a effect on reinforcing your circadian rhythm.

Relaxing in the evening

Sleep can become difficult when the body remains in a state of hyper-vigilance, when the sympathetic autonomic nervous system takes over the parasympathetic. Take an hour to relax before going to bed, in order to get into a mode that promotes the onset of sleepyness. Try to feel your fatigue better in the evening and go to bed when this drowsiness sets in8.

There are effective relaxation techniques available to calm the body. Much like acupuncture, meditation has been shown to have a modulating effect on our nervous system 9,1,2,3. Today, there are many tools to help us in these exercises, including videos shared on the internet and phone applications.

Photo by Idiosyncratic I

Exercice during the day
Photo by Tirachard Kumtanom

A lifestyle that is too inactive can be harmful to sleep. Studies show that physical activity is an important factor in maintaining quality sleep. However, doing strenuous physical activity late in the evening can interfere with sleep. The best time to exercise would be in the afternoon, 4-8 hours before bedtime 10.

Acupressure

Acupressure involves stimulating an acupuncture point, by massaging and applying pressure to the targeted area. Here are two major acupuncture points used to promote sleep11. You can massage these points in the evening, for 1 to 2 minutes, by applying pressure and small rotations with the tip of a finger.
Anmian: It is located at the base of the skull, behind the ear, at the level of the sternocleidomastodis muscle 11.
Yongquan: It is located under the foot, in the depression in the center of the foot, in the upper third towards the base of the toes 11.

Source: Focks, 2009

Photo by Andreas

Eating habits
Photo by Martin Lopez

In traditional Chinese medicine, food is seen as an important tool to help us maintain or regain good health. Foods are classified according to their effects on the body. In a context of insomnia, the general recommendation would be to avoid foods considered very « Yang » and to favor foods nourishing the « Yin » 12.

Yin Foods: Certain foods can be eaten more frequently to nourish the « Yin » components of the body. For example, you could incorporate into your diet foods such as oats, tofu, bone broths, berries, sesame, green vegetables, watercress and bean sprouts, seaweed, fish, pears, as well as eggs 12.

A comfort food in traditional Asian cuisine used to support the « Yin » components of the body is Congee, a rice porridge, served either for lunch or as a side dish when convalescing as it is easy to digest. See Congee Recipe

Yang foods: Conversely, it is recommended to avoid or reduce foods that stimulate the « Yang ». For example, you can reduce your intake of coffee, energy drinks, alcohol, spicy foods, ginger, fatty meats, especially in the afternoon and evening 12.

Please note that these dietary tips are general and a thorough evaluation can be done during an acupuncture session, in order to identify the foods to prioritize in your specific case.


Listening to your body

Insomnia can feel very pervasive sometimes, affecting many aspects of our the daily lives. Acupuncture is a powerful ally to help regain restorative sleep. But sometimes a few lifestyle changes are all it takes to get a better night’s sleep. I invite you to put these few tips into practice, and to see if they help. Listen to your body. He will guide you on the path to balance and well-being.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio

Source for this page:

1.Huijuan Cao,, Xingfang PanHua LiJianping Liu, 2009. Acupuncture for Treatment of Insomnia: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials, J Altern Complement Med. 2009 Nov; 15(11): 1171–1186, Disponible en ligne
2. Zhao K. Acupuncture for the treatment of insomnia. Int Rev Neurobiol. 2013;111:217-34.
3. Guo, J., Wang, L.-P., Liu, C.-Z., Zhang, J., Wang, G.-L., Yi, J.-H., & Cheng, J.-L. (2013). Efficacy of Acupuncture for Primary Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2013, 1–10. doi:10.1155/2013/163850
4. Cheng, K. 2013 Neurobiological mechanisms of acupuncture for some common illnesses: a clinician’s perspective. Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies. 2014 Jun;7(3):105-14. doi: 10.1016/j.jams.2013.07.008. Epub 2013 Aug 17.
5. Schwab, R.J. 2018. Troubles du rythme circadien du sommeil, Mercks Manual, Disponible en ligne .
6. Boubekri M, Cheung IN, Reid KJ, Wang C-H, Zee PC. 2014. Impact of windows and daylight exposure on overall health and sleep quality of office workers: a case-control pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med. 10(6):603–611
7. Leger D, Bayon V, Elbaz M, Philip P, Choudat D. 2011. Underexposure to light at work and its association to insomnia and sleepiness: a cross-sectional study of 13 296 workers of one transportation company. J Psychosom Res. 70(1):29–36
8. Morin, C. Vaincre les ennemis du sommeil, Éditions de l’Homme
9.Tang, Yi-Yuan ; Ma, Yinghua ; Fan, Yaxin ; Feng, Hongbo ; Wang, Junhong ; Feng, Shigang ; Lu, Qilin ; Hu, Bing ; Lin, Yao ; Li, Jian ; Zhang, Ye ; Wang, Yan ; Zhou, Li ; Fan, Ming, 2009. Central and autonomic nervous system interaction is altered by short-term meditation, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America [0027-8424] Tang, Y.-Y. yr:2009 vol:106 iss:22 pg:8865 -8870
10. Youngstedt SD, O’connor PJ, Dishman RK. 1997. The effects of acute exercise on sleep: a quantitative synthesis. Sleep. 20(3):203–214
11.Focks, C. 2009. Atlas d’acupuncture, Edition Elsevier, 738 pages
12. Racette, P.E. 2007 Manger le dragon: compendium de diétothérapie en médecine chinoise, CCDMD




Acupuncture for Migraines

Migraines, this invisible affliction

Many people suffer from migraines and find it difficult to seek relief and continue their normal activities. Migraines are in fact ranked 6th in the world among diseases causing the most years of disability, according to the World Health Organization 1.

Migraines are often a recurring condition, affecting people for many years. They are caused by the activation in the brain of a mechanism leading to the release of painful inflammatory substances around the nerves and blood vessels of the head 1,2. According to the most recent studies, acupuncture is an effective non-pharmaceutical therapy for relieving migraines and reducing their recurrence 3.

The physiological mechanisms behind the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating pain have been the subject of extensive research for over 60 years 4. Although much remains to be learned about the effect of acupuncture on the human body, the neural pathways stimulated by acupuncture points have been mapped, from the stimulation zone, to the spinal cord and pain centers in the brain 4,5,6. Acupuncture has also been shown to activate a number of natural opioids in the body and improve the sensitivity of the brain to these substances4,7. A number of other molecules involved in pain reduction are released or regulated by the stimulation of acupuncture 4,8.

References for this page:

1.Organisation mondiale de la santé, Headache disorders – Fact sheet, Available online
2. Silberstein, S.D. 2020, Migraine, Mercks Manual Professional, Available online
3. McDonald et Janz, 2017, the Acupuncture Evidence Project, A comparative literature review, Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association. Available online
4. Russel, D. & M. Hopper Koppelman. Acupuncture for Pain – Evidence Summary, Evidence based acupuncture, Available online
5. Longhurst, J., Chee-Yee, S., & Li, P. (2017). Defining Acupuncture’s Place in Western Medicine. Scientia, 1–5.
6. Zhang, Z.-J., Wang, X.-M., & McAlonan, G. M. (2012). Neural Acupuncture Unit: A New Concept for Interpreting Effects and Mechanisms of Acupuncture. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2012(3), 1–23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainresbull.2007.08.003
7. Harris, R. E., Zubieta, J.-K., Scott, D. J., Napadow, V., Gracely, R. H., & Clauw, D. J. (2009). Traditional Chinese acupuncture and placebo (sham) acupuncture are differentiated by their effects on μ-opioid receptors (MORs). NeuroImage, 47(3), 1077–1085. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.05.083
8. Zhao, Z.-Q. (2008). Neural mechanism underlying acupuncture analgesia. Progress in Neurobiology, 85(4), 355–375. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pneurobio.2008.05.004
9. Image by Yangcao

Acupuncture et migraine

La migraine, ce mal invisible

Beaucoup de gens souffrent de migraines et peinent à trouver le soulagement pour continuer leurs activités normalement. Les migraines se classent en effet au 6e rang mondial des maladies causant le plus d’années d’invalidité selon l’Organisation mondiale de la santé 1.

Souvent récurrentes, les migraines peuvent affecter les personnes atteintes pendant de nombreuses années. Elles sont causées par l’activation dans le cerveau d’un mécanisme qui conduit à la libération de substances inflammatoires douloureuses autour des nerfs et des vaisseaux sanguins de la tête1,2. Selon les plus récentes études, l’acupuncture est une thérapeutique non médicamenteuse efficace pour soulager les migraines et réduire leur récurrence 3.

Les mécanismes physiologiques expliquant l’efficacité de l’acupuncture pour traiter la douleur ont fait l’objet de recherches approfondies depuis plus de 60 ans 4. Bien qu’il reste encore beaucoup à apprendre sur l’effet de l’acupuncture sur le corps humain en général, les voies neuronales de la stimulation des points d’acupuncture ont été cartographiées, allant de  la zone de stimulation, à la moelle épinière et à la désactivation des centres de la douleur dans le cerveau 4,5,6. Il est aussi démontré que l’acupuncture active un certain nombre d’opioïdes naturels du corps et améliore la sensibilité du cerveau à ces substances4,7. Un certain nombre d’autres molécules impliquées dans la réduction de la douleur sont libérées ou régulées par la stimulation de l’acupuncture 4,8.

Références pour cette page:

1.Organisation mondiale de la santé, Headache disorders – Fact sheet, Disponible en ligne
2. Silberstein, S.D. 2020, Migraine, Mercks Manual Professional, Disponible en ligne
3. McDonald et Janz, 2017, the Acupuncture Evidence Project, A comparative literature review, Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association. Disponible en ligne.
4. Russel, D. & M. Hopper Koppelman. Acupuncture for Pain – Evidence Summary, Evidence based acupuncture, Disponible en ligne
5. Longhurst, J., Chee-Yee, S., & Li, P. (2017). Defining Acupuncture’s Place in Western Medicine. Scientia, 1–5.
6. Zhang, Z.-J., Wang, X.-M., & McAlonan, G. M. (2012). Neural Acupuncture Unit: A New Concept for Interpreting Effects and Mechanisms of Acupuncture. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2012(3), 1–23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainresbull.2007.08.003
7. Harris, R. E., Zubieta, J.-K., Scott, D. J., Napadow, V., Gracely, R. H., & Clauw, D. J. (2009). Traditional Chinese acupuncture and placebo (sham) acupuncture are differentiated by their effects on μ-opioid receptors (MORs). NeuroImage, 47(3), 1077–1085. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.05.083
8. Zhao, Z.-Q. (2008). Neural mechanism underlying acupuncture analgesia. Progress in Neurobiology, 85(4), 355–375. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pneurobio.2008.05.004
9. Image par Yangcao

Acupuncture et sommeil

.

Retomber dans les bras de Morphée

Il nous arrive tous, de temps à autres, d’éprouver des difficultés à trouver le sommeil. Parfois, notre quotidien est plus stressant et nous dormons moins bien. Alors qu’à d’autres moments, l’insomnie nous surprend sans raison apparente. Si ces difficultés à dormir surviennent trop souvent, et que nous n’arrivons plus à trouver le repos nécessaire, la nuit peut devenir source d’angoisse.

Je vois régulièrement en clinique des personnes aux prises avec des troubles de sommeil, que ce soit pour des difficultés d’endormissement, un sommeil entrecoupé, un réveil précoce, ou encore de l’hypersomnie. Chaque semaine, je constate à quel point l’acupuncture peut apporter une aide significative aux personnes qui cherchent à retrouver un sommeil réparateur.

Dans cet article, je vous partage la perspective de la médecine traditionnelle chinoise sur les troubles du sommeil, ainsi que quelques trucs complémentaires pour vous aider à mieux dormir.

Le Yin et le Yang du sommeil

L’acupuncture est utilisée depuis des millénaires pour rééquilibrer l’état « Yin » et « Yang » du corps. Examinons ce concept fondamental de la médecine traditionnelle chinoise de plus près, afin de faire le parallèle avec notre représentation actuelle de la physiologie humaine, et l’équilibre du système nerveux autonome.

Le corps cherche naturellement à maintenir ses systèmes vitaux dans un équilibre sain. Les biologistes appellent cet état l’homéostasie. Dans les troubles du sommeil, le système nerveux autonome est généralement débalancé, et le corps n’entre pas en mode repos. Des études récentes démontrent que l’acupuncture favorise le sommeil 1,2,3, en modulant le système nerveux autonome, permettant ainsi au corps de rétablir son équilibre naturel, son homéostasie 4 .

La médecine traditionnelle chinoise nous décrit les différents états du corps dans un autre langage mais il existe de nombreux parallèles avec la physiologie. L’état « Yin » du corps s’apparente à l’état induit par la portion du système nerveux, qui signale à nos organes et fonctions vitales d’entrer dans une condition de relaxation, un mode favorable au repos, à la digestion, et à la régénération du corps (c’est la branche parasympathique du système nerveux). L’état « Yang » s’apparente quant à lui à l’état induit par la portion du système nerveux qui signale à notre corps d’entrer en mode alerte, suite à un stress par exemple (c’est la branche sympathique du système nerveux). Cet état est relié à l’éveil 4.

Ainsi, chez les personnes aux prises avec des troubles du sommeil, je travaille en clinique à rétablir l’équilibre entre leur état « Yin » et « Yang ». Un biologiste pourrait dire, en d’autres mots, que l’acupuncture modulera leur système nerveux, afin de favoriser un retour à l’homéostasie!

Des habitudes qui favorisent le sommeil

Il est également démontré que d’adopter certaines habitudes peuvent favoriser un sommeil profond et réparateur. Voici quelques trucs.

Consolider votre rythme circadien

Photo prise par Bas Masseus

Le rythme circadien est un rythme biologique interne d’une durée d’environ 24 heures. Une désynchronisation entre les rythmes de veille-sommeil interne et le cycle lumière-obscurité peuvent induire chez une personne de l’insomnie, une somnolence diurne excessive ou les deux 5.

Adopter des habitudes renforçant le rythme circadien favorise le sommeil. Ceci consiste entre autre à synchroniser davantage son exposition à la lumière et l’obscurité, selon l’heure de la journée, pour mieux dormir 6,7. Pour ce faire, exposez-vous à la lumière du soleil ou d’autres sources lumineuses en journée, et tamisez les lumières en soirée. Il est important de réduire votre exposition aux écrans en soirée, car ils émettent une lumière qui reproduit l’effet du soleil sur le corps, et stimule l’éveil. Si vous ne pouvez pas réduire votre temps d’écran en soirée, pensez à installer un filtre à lumière bleue sur les appareils électroniques utilisés.

Tentez aussi de maintenir un horaire de réveil et de sommeil stable tout au long de la semaine. Les grandes variations d’heure de lever et coucher peuvent contribuer à induire des troubles de sommeil chez certaines personnes 5.

Favoriser la détente en soirée

Le sommeil devient difficile quand le corps demeure en état d’hyper-vigilance, lorsque le système nerveux autonome sympathique prend le dessus sur le parasympathique. Prenez une heure pour relaxer avant de vous coucher, de façon à entrer dans un mode favorisant l’apparition de la fatigue. Tentez de mieux ressentir votre fatigue en soirée et d’aller vous coucher lorsque cette somnolence s’installe 8.

Il existe des techniques de relaxation efficaces pour calmer le corps. Tout comme l’acupuncture, la méditation est démontrée avoir un effet modulateur sur notre système nerveux 9,1,2,3. Aujourd’hui, il existe de nombreux d’outils pour nous accompagner dans ces exercices, dont des vidéos partagés sur internet et des applications pour téléphone. Mes recommandations:

l’application gratuite Les méditations;
– l’application gratuite Ma cohérence cardiaque.

Je vous partage aussi l’enregistrement d’un de mes exercices méditatifs simples pour favoriser le sommeil. Bonne écoute!

Exercice de méditation pour favoriser le sommeil
Méditation lue par Kathleen McMeekin, sur une musique de Moby. Le texte est en parti inspiré d’une méditation partagée par Frédéric Burri.

Photo prise par Idiosyncratic I

Faire de l’exercice en journée

Photo prise par Tirachard Kumtanom

Un mode de vie trop inactif peut être nuisible pour le sommeil. Les études démontrent que faire de l’activité physique est un facteur important pour maintenir un sommeil de qualité. Toutefois, pratiquer une activité physique intense tard le soir peut nuire au sommeil. Le moment le plus favorable pour faire de l’exercice physique serait en après-midi, de 4 à 8 heures précédant l’heure du coucher 10.

Acupression

L’acupression consiste à stimuler un point d’acupuncture, par le massage et en appliquant une pression sur la zone visée. Voici deux grands points d’acupuncture utilisés pour favoriser le sommeil11. Vous pouvez masser ces points en soirée, pendant 1 à 2 minutes, en effectuant une pression et des petites rotations avec le bout d’un doigt.

Anmian: Il est situé à la base du crâne, derrière l’oreille, au niveau du muscle sternocleïdomastodien 11.

Yongquan: Il est situé sous le pied, dans la dépression au centre du pied, au tiers supérieur vers la base des orteils 11.

Source: Focks, 2009

Photo par Andreas

Alimentation

Photo prise par Martin Lopez

En médecine traditionnelle chinoise, l’alimentation est perçue comme un outil important pour nous aider à maintenir ou retrouver une bonne santé. Les aliments sont classés selon leurs effets sur le corps. Dans un contexte d’insomnie, la règle générale serait d’éviter des aliments très « Yang » et de favoriser les aliments nourrissant le « Yin » 12.

Aliments Yin: Certains aliments peuvent être consommés plus fréquemment pour nourrir les composantes « Yin » du corps. Par exemples, vous pouvez intégrer davantage dans votre alimentation l’avoine, le tofu, les bouillons à base d’os, les baies, le sésame, les légumes verts, le cresson et les fèves germées, les algues, les poissons, les poires, ainsi que les œufs 12.

Un plat réconfortant de la cuisine traditionnelle asiatique utilisé pour soutenir les composantes « Yin » du corps est le Congee, un gruau de riz, servi soit au déjeuner ou en accompagnement lorsqu’en convalescence. Recette de Congee

Aliments Yang: À l’inverse, il est recommandé d’éviter ou de réduire des aliments qui stimulent le « Yang ». Par exemple, vous pouvez réduire votre consommation en café, boissons énergisantes, alcool, aliments épicés, gingembre, viandes grasses, en particulier en après-midi et soirée 12.

Prenez note que ces conseils alimentaires sont généraux et une évaluation approfondie peut être faite lors d’une session en acupuncture, afin d’identifier les aliments à prioriser dans votre cas précis.


S’écouter

L’insomnie est un problème qui peut être très envahissant et affecter grandement le quotidien de ceux et celles qui en soufrent. L’acupuncture est un puissant allié pour aider à retrouver un sommeil ressourçant. Mais parfois, quelques modifications à notre mode de vie suffisent pour mieux dormir. Je vous invite à mettre en pratique ces quelques conseils, et de partir à la découverte de ce qui favorise votre sommeil. Écoutez votre corps. Il vous guidera sur le chemin de l’équilibre et du mieux être.

Quelques ressources additionnelles:

Université Laval – Service de psychologie – Conseil pour mieux dormir
Agenda du sommeil
Fondation Sommeil

Sources:

1.Huijuan Cao,, Xingfang PanHua LiJianping Liu, 2009. Acupuncture for Treatment of Insomnia: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials, J Altern Complement Med. 2009 Nov; 15(11): 1171–1186, Disponible en ligne
2. Zhao K. Acupuncture for the treatment of insomnia. Int Rev Neurobiol. 2013;111:217-34.
3. Guo, J., Wang, L.-P., Liu, C.-Z., Zhang, J., Wang, G.-L., Yi, J.-H., & Cheng, J.-L. (2013). Efficacy of Acupuncture for Primary Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2013, 1–10. doi:10.1155/2013/163850
4. Cheng, K. 2013 Neurobiological mechanisms of acupuncture for some common illnesses: a clinician’s perspective. Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies. 2014 Jun;7(3):105-14. doi: 10.1016/j.jams.2013.07.008. Epub 2013 Aug 17.
5. Schwab, R.J. 2018. Troubles du rythme circadien du sommeil, Mercks Manual, Disponible en ligne .
6. Boubekri M, Cheung IN, Reid KJ, Wang C-H, Zee PC. 2014. Impact of windows and daylight exposure on overall health and sleep quality of office workers: a case-control pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med. 10(6):603–611
7. Leger D, Bayon V, Elbaz M, Philip P, Choudat D. 2011. Underexposure to light at work and its association to insomnia and sleepiness: a cross-sectional study of 13 296 workers of one transportation company. J Psychosom Res. 70(1):29–36
8. Morin, C. Vaincre les ennemis du sommeil, Éditions de l’Homme
9.Tang, Yi-Yuan ; Ma, Yinghua ; Fan, Yaxin ; Feng, Hongbo ; Wang, Junhong ; Feng, Shigang ; Lu, Qilin ; Hu, Bing ; Lin, Yao ; Li, Jian ; Zhang, Ye ; Wang, Yan ; Zhou, Li ; Fan, Ming, 2009. Central and autonomic nervous system interaction is altered by short-term meditation, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America [0027-8424] Tang, Y.-Y. yr:2009 vol:106 iss:22 pg:8865 -8870
10. Youngstedt SD, O’connor PJ, Dishman RK. 1997. The effects of acute exercise on sleep: a quantitative synthesis. Sleep. 20(3):203–214
11.Focks, C. 2009. Atlas d’acupuncture, Edition Elsevier, 738 pages
12. Racette, P.E. 2007 Manger le dragon: compendium de diétothérapie en médecine chinoise, CCDMD




Photo prise par Andrea Piacquadio